HOW TO PRODUCE A GOOD CV

AIM OF YOUR CV

The aim of your CV is to get you an interview.  Its purpose is to demonstrate that you have the recent relevant experience and skills for the role that you are applying for.  This is a fairly obvious point but it is frequently ignored on the CVs that come across my desk.
For example if you are an Account Executive with some PA responsibilities looking to move up to a Senior Account Executive level please don’t bang on about your diary management skills and your typing speed – these are the parts of your job you wish to leave behind.
Instead focus on what a Senior Account Executive does and emphasise those skills on your CV.

YOUR CV LAYOUT

If you are on your first or second job and you have good academic achievements then I suggest you put them at the top of the page with your degree result in Bold and your A-level results in Bold – don’t hide your academic achievements under a bushel.
If you feel that your work experience stands out more than your academic achievements then I suggest you put your educational qualifications a after your work experience.

LENGTH OF YOUR CV

There seems to be a misconception that a CV should be no more than a page. To best reflect your experience I suggest you let your CV run to 2 pages but no more than that.  Your work experience should run in chronological order showing months as well as years with the most recent job first.

EDITING YOUR CV

When you add a new job edit what has gone before. For example the jobs you did whilst studying may no longer be relevant and could be removed from your CV.  It’s still a good idea to show your early work experience so that there are no gaps in your CV chronology.  However these early jobs merely warrant one line: Company Name, Dates and Job Title.

DESCRIBING YOUR JOB/S

Bullet point your experience and achievements so the information is easy to read and accessible. When considering how best to describe your job think about the purpose of your CV.  Talk about your achievements in the role and the skills that you used.  Answer the questions: What did I achieve? How did I achieve it?

When talking about your current role use the present participle (words ending in -ing) so that it makes your experience sound more immediate for example leading, devising, creating etc.
For previous roles use the past participle (words ending in –ed) for example led, devised, created etc.